Clinical Sports Medicine International
 
 
 The Journal Of All Movement Related Medical Topics In Health & Disease
 
     
 impressum 
CSMI 2010

Anthropometric reference parameters for haemotological values in moderately trained students

Falz R1 , Schulze A1 , Fikenzer S1 , Busse M1

1 Institute of Sports Medicine & Prevention, University of Leipzig (Director: Prof. M. Busse, MD)

Summary

Falz R, Schulze A, Fikenzer S, Busse M . Anthropometric referenz parameters for haemotological values in moderately trained students. Clinical Sports Medicine International (CSMI) 2010, 4: 1-7.

Background:Hemoglobin mass and total blood volume determines oxygen transport capacity. Hemoglobin mass and maximum cardiac output are the most relevant dependent variables of maximum aerobic capacity. Maximum aerobic capacity is often calculated in relation to whole body mass and body composition. Aim of this study is to determine total hemoglobin mass and other hematological parameters in relation to body composition parameters as measured using a bioimpedance method.

Objective:The purpose of this study was to create first reference values of blood volume and hematological parameters in young and moderately trained people.

Materials and methods:Measurements were performed in 100 students (54 men, 46 women, mean age 24 or 21 years) of the University of Leipzig during their clinical courses. The data ascertainment included the following parameters: body weight and height, water (TBW), fat mass (FM), body cell mass (BCM), and lean body mass (LBM); hematocrit (HCT), fraction of hemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin mass (tHb). Total hemoglobin mass was measured using a modified closed circle rebreathing CO-method. Total blood volume (BV) and total erythrocyte volume (RCV) were calculated from tHb and hematocrite values. Data were assessed separately for men and women and gender differences were calculated. A correlation analyses was performed for the relation between body composition and hematological parameters.

Results:Mixed group:
Mean values for tHb, BV, RCV: 842g, 5975ml, 2408ml. Body weight and LBM: 68 kg, 55kg. Relation between body composition and hematological parameters: BV vs weight: r=0,84; tHb vs weight: r=0,8; BV vs LBM: r=0,92; tHb vs LBM: r=0,91. BV may be estimated from LBM as follows: BV (l) = 0,122 LBM (kg) – 0,818; r=0,9 or approximately 0,106 l per kg LBM.
Gender specific results:
Women: Mean values for tHb, BV, RCV: 637g, 4952ml, 1861ml. Body weight and LBM: 62kg, 47kg. Relation between body composition and hematological parameters: BV vs weight: r=0,69; tHb vs weight: r=0,63; BV vs LBM: r=0,76; tHb vs LBM: r=0,64. BV may be estimated from LBM as follows: BV (l) = 0,153 LBM (kg) – 2,233; r=0,76 or approximately 0,1 l per kg LBM.
Men: Mean values for tHb, BV, RCV: 1045g, 6846ml, 2873ml. Body weight and LBM: 73kg, 63kg. Relation between body composition and hematological parameters: BV vs weight: r=0,74; tHb vs weight: r=0,65; BV vs LBM: r=0,79; tHb vs LBM: r=0,67. BV may be estimated from LBM as follows: BV (l) = 0,125 LBM (kg) – 1,014; r=0,79 or approximately 0,1 l per kg LBM.

Conclusion: The major result of this study is that the relation between blood volume and lean body mass is almost equal in men and women. So the results prove that for general purposes fat free mass should be used for hemoglobin mass or blood volume estimation. On the other hand a relatively large variation between the subjects indicates that total hemoglobin should be measured directly whenever higher precision is desired. Different regressions equations must be used for men or women for almost all parameters when body weight is used. Total blood volume is about 0,1 l per kg lean body mass in men and women. Therefore the difference in relative maximum O2-uptake (ml/kg body weight) can be explained by a minor portion of body fat in men. Other factors such as cardiac output may play a major role.

Keywords: Hemoglobin mass, blood volume, body composition, gender

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